The Regrarians Platform: A Review of Darren Doherty’s REX10 course.

The Regrarians Platform:  A Review of Darren Doherty’s REX10 course.

I’ve just come back to Saudi Arabia after a 3 week trip to California, which involved speaking at PV3 and attending a 10 day course taught by Daren Doherty on the Regrarians Platform.  The course was held at a ranch in Santa Barbara, and involved a day for each of the elements of a modified Keyline Scale of Permanence.

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Let me start off by saying that I was blown away by this course.  The Regrarians platform fills the major gap in professional sustainable land management & design.  Permaculture teaches principles, a new way of thinking & ethics, and it was the lingua franca of the students at this course.  Holistic Management is the best management system for regenerative land use that I am aware of.  What both permaculture and HM lack is the process for design.  This is what the REX course does; it gives a process for integrating permaculture design & HM into a cohesive whole.   Together, the 3 of them form a framework and foundation to create professional designs & plans that are effective, efficient, and appropriate to the context you’re in.  As such, I consider this course essential for anybody serious about becoming a professional in the field of designing regenerative land and water use.

Here’s an example:

It is a permacultural moré to have as many species of interplanted everything as possible.  Many folks when developing a food forest boast about having 50 or 80 species spread between 7  integrated layers.  We’ve all seen Geoff Lawton’s videos walking through a food forest saying, “here’s an X, and here’s a Y, and here’s a Z, and look over here, it’s a J!”  There is abundance everywhere in those videos, and I admit that on a gut level those are very sexy forest systems.  There’s so much diversity!  There’s so much stuff growing!  So much life and abundance!  It’s true.

On the other hand, I suspect this norm in the permaculture world is one of the reasons why permaculture implementation is largely limited to homesteads and small farms.  Getting 80 species into one area is a ridiculous way to plant if you want to efficiently harvest and sell a crop, especially tree crops.  On large scale agriculture, you have to harvest efficiently, which is impossible when you have ecological hodgepodges.   Those hodgepodges require serious labor, which requires serious money, which almost no farmers have.

On the site I’ve been working on in Al Baydha, harvesting was not much of a consideration when we did our initial design.  The questions were:  Can we actually get things to grow here?   Our objective was a closed canopy system alleyed with grazing strips, modeled somewhat after a food forest in Morocco.  But never did we consider, “If these grow here, how are we going to harvest them and get them to market?  How will we integrate drip irrigation lines with fencing, grazing systems, tree crops, and a way to harvest efficiently?”  The lack of that question is going to affect the potential profitability of our demo site in Saudi Arabia forever.

I knew 5 years ago that on that site we would need to integrate fencing with access with water with grazing with forestry: Those are the basic components for a sustainable silvopasture system.  That’s a complex system with many moving parts.  Integrating all of those pieces into a cohesive whole was something I had no process for doing.  I could figure out which zones things would go in & figure out how the outputs for one had to get to the inputs of another.  But I did not know how to  organize them in a cost-effective way that would allow for the end goal of harvesting, processing, and selling.

Now I do.

On a more personal note, I was fortunate to connect with some stellar people who take land management, water management, agriculture, and sustainability very seriously and very passionately.  It was a blessing to rub shoulders with 30 folks working on a very high level and learn together.  I think everyone who attended came away with a lot of energy, a rekindled desire to learn, and a lot less complacency.

Thanks to Darren Doherty & Lisa Heenan & Family for the work they are doing.  I appreciate them sharing their mistakes so openly, because it means I don’t have to commit the same ones in my own work.  This REX course is next-level stuff and essential to people who want to get into large-scale regenerative agriculture.

3 Comments

  1. Thank you for this write up!!! I really wish I could have been there for the course in CA, but I’m going to try my best to make it out to Vermont for the one in August. I think that this is the missing link for those who are truly working to take the consultation in regenerative agriculture to the next level.

    Reply
    • You’re going to by in VT (NY)? :) Yeah! I am doing everything in my power to be there myself and it would be great to see you again. Was thinking TN, but it doesn’t fit into my planting/farming schedule, but it would have been a great reunion.

      Best to you,

      Sven

      Reply
  2. Nice review, thanks!

    Reply

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